Partially Raised by Mark Twain: Thoughts the Night Before Intersession

My grandfather was a powerful man.

He wasn’t strong in a brash, bruising or bullish way, but he was the kind of guy that people listened to. He was sharp, empathetic and encouraging. He was interested, baritone-voiced and familiar. He was learned, read and he loved loved Mark Twain. Rarely a family get-together would go on without Twain quotes booming from his deep Kentucky voice box.

“What is the difference between a taxidermist and a tax collector? The taxidermist takes only your skin.”

“France has neither winter nor summer nor morals — apart from these drawbacks it is a fine country.”

“Anyone who stops learning is old, whether twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young. The greatest thing you can do is keep your mind young.”

I think he loved Twain’s cavalier demeanor. My grandfather had strong opinions and quick wit, but his kindness always kept him from being crass. Sort of like Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, Twain gave him a chance to adventure out of his properness. This tension between gentility and adventure was the paintbrush and palette of my childhood. A paraphrase of Twain’s thoughts echoes through our family’s history.

“I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.”

Though I grew up in a family full of teachers, many of the most significant learning experiences of my life happened outside-of or even in-spite-of the traditional school setting I was enrolled in. I found immense joy in playing outside. Growing up on a small farm afforded me the luxury of space and simplicity. Throughout the open range of my “backyard” I built forts and skate ramps. I caught fish and learned to drive a tractor.

Since I began teaching at High Tech High I have cherished our tension. In many ways, the wildness of our school reminds me of home. The qualities that made my grandfather great are abundant in the work and people I see around me. I see kindness and thoughtfulness, wit and clarity. I also see the edge and wildness that he loved about Twain.

Tomorrow morning High Tech High begins our annual intersession. Throughout the school students will participate in two-week intensive courses ranging from cycling, building furniture, painting, sculpting and baking, to yoga, film critiquing, cooking and learning to swim. Teachers have designed courses based on their personal passions and fields where they might be pursuing their own learning.

For the second year in a row, my students will be exploring buoyancy before designing and building rafts that will be used to float down the lower section of the Colorado River. Floatopia! 2016 was a thrill. Much like Twain’s characters floating down the Mississippi River, our students were given a chance to be adventurers; to learn on the fly…or float. I am excited to further develop our rafting adventure with a new group of students this year. Floatopia! 2.0 is an homage to Twain’s famous comment about education being stifled by schooling and its also a celebration of the awesomeness that exists in “figuring something out.”

I feel blessed to have had people like my grandfather to guide me as I grew up. His character is still a model I hopefully strive toward. I also feel grateful to have had an upbringing that allowed and encouraged me to do wild and creative things. The little piece of me that was raised by Mark Twain is stoked about this project.

Track our progress!

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Intersession 2016: Floatopia!

I almost named my daughter River. Much like the words of Herman Hesse found below, I often have found myself feeling encompassed by the power and fleeting nature of massive moving water.

“Have you also learned that secret from the river; that there is no such thing as time?” That the river is everywhere at the same time, at the source and at the mouth, at the waterfall, at the ferry, at the current, in the ocean and in the mountains, everywhere and that the present only exists for it, not the shadow of the past nor the shadow of the future.”
― Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Over the last couple of weeks our school has held a nine-day intersession. Students were given a fair amount of choice between intensive courses designed by teachers. Options for students included experiences with cooking, art, building, gardening, sci-fi, camping, machining, and astronomy. Over the course of my eleven years here, intersession has become one of my favorite times.

This year I decided to take an aside from my usual fishing course and focus on a more audacious aquatic experience. During my Floatopia! course students were commissioned to design and build rafts out of 55 gallon barrels and simple lumber. They had to calculate buoyancy, plan weight distribution of their crew and gear and organizing camping materials for a 15 mile float down the Colorado River. Fun.

The course began indoors with raft prototypes and materials testing. Many of the students had not worked with power tools and very few of them had constructed on such a large scale.

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Early construction of rafts. We had to build indoors because San Diego was receiving record rainfall. Rafts began as a deck construction sitting on top of 55 gallon barrels.

 

Once rafts were close to completion we took each vessel out to San Diego Bay to test their stability and functionality.

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First testing of a barrel-construction raft with a group of sophomore boys.
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A group of 9th and 10th grade girls test their raft (and slide) on San Diego Bay.

At the start of the second week we made our way out to the Colorado river at Picacho State Recreation Area. The views of the river and sunset were alarmingly beautiful as we pulled into the campground. The students setup camp, hiked up rocky hills to watched the stars and sat around camp stoves and fires with their tent-mates. When we woke up the next morning students completed re-assembly and maintenance of their rafts before we “cut lines” and set off down the river.

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Summer ’15: Teacher Vignettes from the Woods Pt. 3 The effect

“I could but esteem this moment of my departure as among the most happy of my life.” Meriwether Lewis

Like the floor of some amazing carpenter’s workshop, the rivers and lakes beneath the Norther Cascades flow constant with the dust of its prominent peaks. The glaciers, as they creak and crawl, carve fine and seemingly infinite rock flower from their towering trails. The powder, once met with the reflections of sky and deep forest, glow brilliant aquamarine. The effect seems artificial.

Beautiful landscapes inspire. The few moments where I have found myself in both amazing atmosphere and immersed in “teacher” thought have produced some of my most inspired lesson plans and project ideas.

My son in full adventure at Ross Lake in Northern Cascades National Park.
My son in full adventure at Ross Lake in Northern Cascades National Park.

Summer ’15: Teacher Vignettes from the Woods Pt. 2

“The old man looked at him with his sun-burned, confident loving eyes.”
― Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

Waist deep with feet spread to hold me against the current, I carefully released line into my back cast. Making sure to avoid my daughter as she hopped to and from shoreline rocks, I swung the rod hard to dry my fly. After four or five overhead motions I set the floating lure down in gentle water next to a slow eddy. After a couple of moments I pulled the line away and set it again with all softness.

The Skykomish burst to life. A blitz of silver and iridescence arched out of the water, bridled itself to my hook and pulled my fly down into the clear and crashing water. Without any grace, I slipped from my perch on the rock and the waterline rose to my shoulders. The steelhead was on.

With as much patience as a freezing river and euphoria would allow, I angled the fish toward shore. After several powerful and nerve-wracking runs the animal slowed and finally submitted to the lift of my rod and the bottom of my net.

There is something very special about catching a fish. Over the course of my life I have had family and mentors teach me the patience and technique needed to be successful. I learned to fish the desert for largemouth bass and flathead catfish, fly fish the Sierras for golden trout, and troll the Sea of Cortez for billfish. The species I have caught, the places I have experience and the delicious meals I have eaten are all part of a lived journal of learning, trying, failing and succeeding.

Kids need these feelings. They don’t have to learn to fish, but they should have a “lived journal of learning”. I hope that my class provides some of this during our time together this year. I hope that sometimes they see me Like Hemingway’s Santiago (The Old Man and the Sea), a man who tries to be real and commits to an ideal while still being able to reflect upon his mistakes. I love that Santiago loves the boy so very much that, even though he needs his help, he wants the boy to be more than a simple fisherman. This was the hope of my father while he taught me to read and write and play guitar. This was the goal of my grandfathers while they taught me to tie a hook to fishing line and to read the water and shoreline to anticipate where a fish was hiding.

The school year is rolling and I am thrilled to turn kids’ eyes toward those things that amaze us.

Summer ’15: Teacher Vignettes from the Woods Pt. 1

“The mountains are calling and I must go.” -John Muir

Though each step seemed to demand a certain mustered discipline, we were ascending steeply and  steadily. With full backpacks we scrambled three quarters of a mile up a boulder-lined waterfall, balanced our way 2 miles across mountain peak shoulders and came to the foot of our final ascent. The climb was incredible. Seven hundred feet of class 3+ ascent beginning at an elevation of 11,200ft. As we reached the crest our weary faces morphed at the sight of the new and beautiful basin below us.

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Our final ascent up Hurd Peak. Notice the steep and unstable terrain…and ice!
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Exhausted, joyful and relieved at the top.
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View of Treasure Lakes, where we began our final climb.
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Bishop Pass Trail…the other side of the mountain.

Only a day earlier we were at sea level, departing San Diego for a few days in the Sierras.

Sometimes I need reminders like this. I need to be shown (not told) that amazing endeavor and adventure are always within reach. I can’t wait to share experiences like these with my new group of students. My hope is that they find value in doing “hard things”; that they accept challenges that will bring out the very best parts of their character and our human nature.

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