Summer ’15: Teacher Vignettes from the Woods Pt. 2

“The old man looked at him with his sun-burned, confident loving eyes.”
― Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

Waist deep with feet spread to hold me against the current, I carefully released line into my back cast. Making sure to avoid my daughter as she hopped to and from shoreline rocks, I swung the rod hard to dry my fly. After four or five overhead motions I set the floating lure down in gentle water next to a slow eddy. After a couple of moments I pulled the line away and set it again with all softness.

The Skykomish burst to life. A blitz of silver and iridescence arched out of the water, bridled itself to my hook and pulled my fly down into the clear and crashing water. Without any grace, I slipped from my perch on the rock and the waterline rose to my shoulders. The steelhead was on.

With as much patience as a freezing river and euphoria would allow, I angled the fish toward shore. After several powerful and nerve-wracking runs the animal slowed and finally submitted to the lift of my rod and the bottom of my net.

There is something very special about catching a fish. Over the course of my life I have had family and mentors teach me the patience and technique needed to be successful. I learned to fish the desert for largemouth bass and flathead catfish, fly fish the Sierras for golden trout, and troll the Sea of Cortez for billfish. The species I have caught, the places I have experience and the delicious meals I have eaten are all part of a lived journal of learning, trying, failing and succeeding.

Kids need these feelings. They don’t have to learn to fish, but they should have a “lived journal of learning”. I hope that my class provides some of this during our time together this year. I hope that sometimes they see me Like Hemingway’s Santiago (The Old Man and the Sea), a man who tries to be real and commits to an ideal while still being able to reflect upon his mistakes. I love that Santiago loves the boy so very much that, even though he needs his help, he wants the boy to be more than a simple fisherman. This was the hope of my father while he taught me to read and write and play guitar. This was the goal of my grandfathers while they taught me to tie a hook to fishing line and to read the water and shoreline to anticipate where a fish was hiding.

The school year is rolling and I am thrilled to turn kids’ eyes toward those things that amaze us.

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Year 12…The Opposite of “Senioritis”

The Thinking:

Every year feels like a new grade level. In some ways I feel like I am about to enter some absurd year of my own learning. The 28th grade, or some thing like it, is upon me and right now I am captured by its possibilities.

For all the repetition that each Fall brings, this academic year has a different feel to it. I am teaching the same grade level (9th), the same subject (humanities) and in the same classroom, but my hopes for this year are more exciting and nerve-wracking than usual.

I want to be better.

I want my classroom to be better. I want my reading assignments to be more valuable. I want my writing assignments to be more interesting and inspiring. I want my projects to be more integrated and authentic. I want my conversations with students to be more positive and formative than ever before.

The Action:

In an attempt to push my practice I am trying a few things.

  • A new classroom layout that opens the room for me to move throughout the students and makes it easier for me to keep things clean and organized.
I hope that fewer tables will allow me to interact with my students more fluidly and to keep my floors and furniture more clean and organized.
I hope that fewer tables will allow me to interact with my students more fluidly and will help to keep my floors and furniture more clean and organized.
  • Project-specific workstations where students have access to tools that will be necessary/helpful to the project we are working on. Instead of the tools moving I am hoping to treat our graphic design, music and other tech tools much like tools in a machine shop are treated. The students will have time at each area when they need it.
iMacs ready with Logic Pro X for multi-track recording and producing soundscape recordings from field trips into nature.
iMacs ready with Logic Pro X for multi-track recording and producing soundscape recordings from field trips in nature.
Large format scanner setup for scanning original artwork and designs for digital purposes including online portfolios, laser-cutting and digital revision.
Large format scanner setup for scanning original artwork and designs for digital purposes including online portfolios, laser-cutting and digital revision.
An HP Sprout setup to experiment with tablet tracing and 2D/3D modeling.
An HP Sprout setup to experiment with tablet tracing and 2D/3D modeling.
A vinyl cutter with design software installed on two PCs for stencil cutting, precision marking of paper/thin sheeting, and other applications.
A vinyl cutter with design software installed on two PCs for stencil cutting, precision marking of paper/thin sheeting, and other applications.
  • Making stronger connections between my passions and my vocation.
    • My thinking has been pushed by the experiences I’ve had over the summer, which I discuss in a few vignettes beginning with Vignettes from the Woods Pt. 1. I love that I work for an organization where my passions and pleasures and escapes are all fuel for what will happen in my professional life. I can’t wait to challenge students to live and explore and take in the beauty of the world with intentionality.
  • Diversifying the reading required for my class to include more short stories and essays and fewer non-fiction articles or papers.
    •   I have been reading some amazing short writing that I’m anxious to share with my students (Muir, Asimov, Emerson etc.). I’m hoping that using shorter writing pieces and taking more time to work our way through them will help me identify struggling students and will allow me and our support staff to intervene before anyone falls too far behind. Multiple short pieces also make comparative activities between pieces more accessible.

Tomorrow is the first day. Let’s go!

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Summer ’15: Teacher Vignettes from the Woods Pt. 1

“The mountains are calling and I must go.” -John Muir

Though each step seemed to demand a certain mustered discipline, we were ascending steeply and  steadily. With full backpacks we scrambled three quarters of a mile up a boulder-lined waterfall, balanced our way 2 miles across mountain peak shoulders and came to the foot of our final ascent. The climb was incredible. Seven hundred feet of class 3+ ascent beginning at an elevation of 11,200ft. As we reached the crest our weary faces morphed at the sight of the new and beautiful basin below us.

Hurd Peak Shoulder
Our final ascent up Hurd Peak. Notice the steep and unstable terrain…and ice!
photo (3)
Exhausted, joyful and relieved at the top.
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View of Treasure Lakes, where we began our final climb.
photo (2)
Bishop Pass Trail…the other side of the mountain.

Only a day earlier we were at sea level, departing San Diego for a few days in the Sierras.

Sometimes I need reminders like this. I need to be shown (not told) that amazing endeavor and adventure are always within reach. I can’t wait to share experiences like these with my new group of students. My hope is that they find value in doing “hard things”; that they accept challenges that will bring out the very best parts of their character and our human nature.

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