Intersession 2016: Floatopia!

I almost named my daughter River. Much like the words of Herman Hesse found below, I often have found myself feeling encompassed by the power and fleeting nature of massive moving water.

“Have you also learned that secret from the river; that there is no such thing as time?” That the river is everywhere at the same time, at the source and at the mouth, at the waterfall, at the ferry, at the current, in the ocean and in the mountains, everywhere and that the present only exists for it, not the shadow of the past nor the shadow of the future.”
― Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Over the last couple of weeks our school has held a nine-day intersession. Students were given a fair amount of choice between intensive courses designed by teachers. Options for students included experiences with cooking, art, building, gardening, sci-fi, camping, machining, and astronomy. Over the course of my eleven years here, intersession has become one of my favorite times.

This year I decided to take an aside from my usual fishing course and focus on a more audacious aquatic experience. During my Floatopia! course students were commissioned to design and build rafts out of 55 gallon barrels and simple lumber. They had to calculate buoyancy, plan weight distribution of their crew and gear and organizing camping materials for a 15 mile float down the Colorado River. Fun.

The course began indoors with raft prototypes and materials testing. Many of the students had not worked with power tools and very few of them had constructed on such a large scale.

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Early construction of rafts. We had to build indoors because San Diego was receiving record rainfall. Rafts began as a deck construction sitting on top of 55 gallon barrels.

 

Once rafts were close to completion we took each vessel out to San Diego Bay to test their stability and functionality.

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First testing of a barrel-construction raft with a group of sophomore boys.
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A group of 9th and 10th grade girls test their raft (and slide) on San Diego Bay.

At the start of the second week we made our way out to the Colorado river at Picacho State Recreation Area. The views of the river and sunset were alarmingly beautiful as we pulled into the campground. The students setup camp, hiked up rocky hills to watched the stars and sat around camp stoves and fires with their tent-mates. When we woke up the next morning students completed re-assembly and maintenance of their rafts before we “cut lines” and set off down the river.

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Year 12…The Opposite of “Senioritis”

The Thinking:

Every year feels like a new grade level. In some ways I feel like I am about to enter some absurd year of my own learning. The 28th grade, or some thing like it, is upon me and right now I am captured by its possibilities.

For all the repetition that each Fall brings, this academic year has a different feel to it. I am teaching the same grade level (9th), the same subject (humanities) and in the same classroom, but my hopes for this year are more exciting and nerve-wracking than usual.

I want to be better.

I want my classroom to be better. I want my reading assignments to be more valuable. I want my writing assignments to be more interesting and inspiring. I want my projects to be more integrated and authentic. I want my conversations with students to be more positive and formative than ever before.

The Action:

In an attempt to push my practice I am trying a few things.

  • A new classroom layout that opens the room for me to move throughout the students and makes it easier for me to keep things clean and organized.
I hope that fewer tables will allow me to interact with my students more fluidly and to keep my floors and furniture more clean and organized.
I hope that fewer tables will allow me to interact with my students more fluidly and will help to keep my floors and furniture more clean and organized.
  • Project-specific workstations where students have access to tools that will be necessary/helpful to the project we are working on. Instead of the tools moving I am hoping to treat our graphic design, music and other tech tools much like tools in a machine shop are treated. The students will have time at each area when they need it.
iMacs ready with Logic Pro X for multi-track recording and producing soundscape recordings from field trips into nature.
iMacs ready with Logic Pro X for multi-track recording and producing soundscape recordings from field trips in nature.
Large format scanner setup for scanning original artwork and designs for digital purposes including online portfolios, laser-cutting and digital revision.
Large format scanner setup for scanning original artwork and designs for digital purposes including online portfolios, laser-cutting and digital revision.
An HP Sprout setup to experiment with tablet tracing and 2D/3D modeling.
An HP Sprout setup to experiment with tablet tracing and 2D/3D modeling.
A vinyl cutter with design software installed on two PCs for stencil cutting, precision marking of paper/thin sheeting, and other applications.
A vinyl cutter with design software installed on two PCs for stencil cutting, precision marking of paper/thin sheeting, and other applications.
  • Making stronger connections between my passions and my vocation.
    • My thinking has been pushed by the experiences I’ve had over the summer, which I discuss in a few vignettes beginning with Vignettes from the Woods Pt. 1. I love that I work for an organization where my passions and pleasures and escapes are all fuel for what will happen in my professional life. I can’t wait to challenge students to live and explore and take in the beauty of the world with intentionality.
  • Diversifying the reading required for my class to include more short stories and essays and fewer non-fiction articles or papers.
    •   I have been reading some amazing short writing that I’m anxious to share with my students (Muir, Asimov, Emerson etc.). I’m hoping that using shorter writing pieces and taking more time to work our way through them will help me identify struggling students and will allow me and our support staff to intervene before anyone falls too far behind. Multiple short pieces also make comparative activities between pieces more accessible.

Tomorrow is the first day. Let’s go!

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Summer ’15: Teacher Vignettes from the Woods Pt. 1

“The mountains are calling and I must go.” -John Muir

Though each step seemed to demand a certain mustered discipline, we were ascending steeply and  steadily. With full backpacks we scrambled three quarters of a mile up a boulder-lined waterfall, balanced our way 2 miles across mountain peak shoulders and came to the foot of our final ascent. The climb was incredible. Seven hundred feet of class 3+ ascent beginning at an elevation of 11,200ft. As we reached the crest our weary faces morphed at the sight of the new and beautiful basin below us.

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Our final ascent up Hurd Peak. Notice the steep and unstable terrain…and ice!
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Exhausted, joyful and relieved at the top.
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View of Treasure Lakes, where we began our final climb.
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Bishop Pass Trail…the other side of the mountain.

Only a day earlier we were at sea level, departing San Diego for a few days in the Sierras.

Sometimes I need reminders like this. I need to be shown (not told) that amazing endeavor and adventure are always within reach. I can’t wait to share experiences like these with my new group of students. My hope is that they find value in doing “hard things”; that they accept challenges that will bring out the very best parts of their character and our human nature.

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